Thursday, 31 January 2019

Information Security no longer the Department of “NO”

The information security function within business has gained the rather unfortunate reputation for being the department of “no”, often viewed as a blocker to IT innovation and business transformation. A department seen as out of touch with genuine business needs, and with the demands of evolving workforce demographic of increasing numbers of numbers Millennials and Centennials. However, new research by IDC\Capgemini reveals that attitudes are changing, and business leaders are increasingly relying on their Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) to create meaningful business impact.


The study bears out a shift in executive perceptions that information security is indeed important to the business. With the modern CISO evolving from that of a responder, to a driver of change, enabling to build businesses to be secure by design. The survey found CISOs are now involved in 90% of significant business decisions, with 25% of business executives perceive CISOs as proactively enabling digital transformation, which is a key goal for 89% of organisations surveyed by IDC.

Key findings from the research include: 

  • Information security is a business differentiator – Business executives think the number one reason for information security is competitive advantage and differentiation, followed by business efficiency. Just 15% of business executives think information security is a blocker of innovation, indicating that information security is no longer the ‘department of no’ 
  • CISOs are now boardroom players – 80% of business executives and CISOs think their personal influence has improved in the last three years. CISOs are now involved in 90% of medium or high influence boardroom decisions 
  • CISOs must lead digital transformation efforts – At present, less than 25% of business executives think CISOs proactively enable digital transformation. To stay relevant, CISOs must become business enablers. They need to adopt business mindsets and push digital transformation forward, not react to it. CISOs that fail to adopt a business mindset will be replaced by more forward-thinking players.
From NO to GO
CISOs have made great leaps forward
  • Focused on making security operations effective and efficient 
  • Engaged with the rest of the business 
  • Seen as key SMEs to the board 
  • Responding to business requests and enabling change
 

CISOs now need to pivot to because business leaders
  • Need to be part of the business change ecosystem
  • Must be seen as drivers rather than responders
  • CISO as entrepreneur and innovator

Monday, 28 January 2019

43% of Cybercrimes Target Small Businesses - Are You Next?

Cybercrimes cost UK small companies an average of £894 in the year ending February of 2018. Small businesses are an easy target for cybercrooks, so it little surprise that around about 43% of cybercrime is committed against small businesses. According to research conducted by EveryCloud, there is much more at stake than a £900 annual loss, with six out of ten small businesses closing within six months of a data breach.

Damage to a small company’s reputation can be difficult to repair and recover from following a data breach. Since the GDPR data privacy law came in force in May 2018, companies face significant financial sanctions from regulators if found negligent in safeguarding personal information. Add in the potential for civil suits the potential costs start mounting up fast, which could even turn into a business killer.  Case in point is political consulting and data mining firm Cambridge Analytica, which went under in May 2018 after being implicated with data privacy issues related to its use of personal data held on Facebook. However, most small businesses taken out by cyber attacks don't have the public profile to make the deadly headlines.

Most big companies have contingency plans and resources to take the hit from a major cyber attack, although major cyber attacks prove highly costly to big business, the vast majority are able to recover and continue trading. Working on a tight budget, small businesses just doesn't the deep pockets of big business. Cyber resilience is not a high priority within most small businesses strategies, as you might image business plans are typically very business growth focused.

Cyber resilience within small business need not be difficult, but it does involve going beyond installing antivirus. A great starting point is UK National Cyber Security Centre's Cyber Essentials Scheme, a simple but effective approach to help businesses protect themselves from the most common cyber attacks. You’ll also need to pay attention to staff security awareness training in the workplace.

Every employee must ensure that the company is protected from attacks as much as possible. It’s your responsibility to make sure that everyone understands this and knows what preventative measures to put in place.

It may cost a few bob, but getting an expert in to check for holes in your cybersecurity is a good place to start. They can check for potential risk areas and also educate you and your staff about security awareness.

We all know the basics, but how many times do we let convenience trump good common sense? For example, how many times have you used the same password when registering for different sites?

How strong is the password that you chose? If it’s easy for you to remember, then there’s a good chance that it’s not as secure as you’d like. If you’d like more tips on keeping your information secure, then check out the infographic below.


Friday, 25 January 2019

The Emergence of Geopolitical Fuelled Cyber Attacks

A new breed of cyberattack is emerging into the threat landscape, fuelled by geopolitical tension, there has been a rise in stealthy and sophisticated cyber attacks reported within recent industry reports. Carbon Blacks 2019 Global Threat Report, released on Wednesday (23/1/19), concluded global governments experienced an increase in cyberattacks during 2018 stemming from Russia, China and North Korea, while nearly 60% of all attacks involved lateral movement.

'Lateral Movement' is where an attacker progressively and stealthy moves through a victim's network as to find their targets, which are typically datasets or critical assets. This is an attack of sophistication, requiring skill, resources and persistence, beyond the interest of average criminal hackers, whom go after the lowest hanging fruit for an easier financial return.


Carbon Black concluded that as 2018 came to a close, China and Russia were responsible for nearly half of all cyberattacks they detected. 

The US and UK government agencies have publicly articulated their distrust of Chinese tech giant Huawei, which resulted in BT removing Huawei IT kit from their new 5G and existing 4G networks last month. UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said he had "very deep concerns" about Huawei being involved with the new UK mobile network due to security concerns. At end of 2017 the UK National Cyber Security Centre warned government agencies against using Kaspersky's products and services, which followed a ban by the US government. Barclays responded by removing their free offering of Kaspersky anti-virus its customers. The UK and US also blamed North Korea for the devastating WannaCry attacks in 2017.

Another interesting stat from the Carbon Black Global Threat Report that caught the eye, was 2018 saw an approximate $1.8 billion worth of cryptocurrency-thefts, which underlines the cyber-criminal threat still remains larger than ever within the threat landscape.

Monday, 21 January 2019

Is AI the Answer to never-ending Cybersecurity Problems?

Paul German, CEO, Certes Networks, talks about the impact and the benefits of Artificial Intelligence(AI) driven cybersecurity. And how AI adoption is helping organisations to stay ahead in the never-ending game that is cybersecurity.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. With 20% of the C-suite already using machine learning and 41% of consumers believing that AI will improve their lives, wide scale adoption is imminent across every industry - and cybersecurity is no exception. A lot has changed in the cyber landscape over the past few years and AI is being pushed to the forefront of conversations. It’s becoming more than a buzzword and delivering true business value. Its ability to aid the cybersecurity industry is increasingly being debated; some argue it has the potential to revolutionise cybersecurity, whilst others insist that the drawbacks outweigh the benefits.

With several issues facing the current cybersecurity landscape such as a disappearing IT perimeter, a widening skills gap, increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks and data breaches continuing to hit headlines, a remedy is needed. The nature of stolen data has also changed - CVV and passport numbers are becoming compromised, so coupled with regulations such as GDPR, organisations are facing a minefield.

Research shows that 60% think AI has the ability to find attacks before they do damage. But is AI the answer to the never-ending cybersecurity problems facing organisations today?

The Cost-Benefit Conundrum
On one hand, AI could provide an extremely large benefit to the overall framework of cybersecurity defences. On the other, the reality that it equally has the potential to be a danger under certain conditions cannot be ignored. Hackers are fast gaining the ability to foil security algorithms by targeting the data AI technology is training on. Inevitably, this could have devastating consequences.

AI can be deployed by both sides - by the attackers and the defenders. It does have a number of benefits such as the ability to learn and adapt to its current learning environment and the threat landscape. If it was deployed correctly, AI could consistently collect intelligence about new threats, attempted attacks, successful data breaches, blocked or failed attacks and learn from it all, fulfilling its purpose of defending the digital assets of an organisation. By immediately reacting to attempted breaches, mitigating and addressing the threat, cybersecurity could truly reach the next level as the technology would be constantly learning to detect and protect.

Additionally, AI technology has the ability to pick up abnormalities within an organisation’s network and flag it quicker than a member of the cybersecurity or IT team could; AI’s ability to understand ‘normal’ behaviour would allow it to bring attention to potentially malicious behaviour of suspicious or abnormal user or device activity.

As with most new technologies, for each positive there is an equal negative. AI could be configured by hackers to learn the specific defences and tools that it runs up against which would give way to larger and more successful data breaches. Viruses could be created to host this type of AI, producing more malware that can bypass even more advanced security implementations. This approach would likely be favoured by hackers as they don’t even need to tamper with the data itself - they could work out the features of the code a model is using and mirror it with their own. In this particular care, the tables would be turned and organisations could find themselves in sticky situations if they can’t keep up with hackers.

Organisations must be wary that they don’t adopt AI technology in cybersecurity ‘just because.’ As attack surfaces expand and hackers become more sophisticated, cybersecurity strategies must evolve to keep up. AI contributes to this expanding attack surface so when it comes down to deployment, the benefits must be weighed up against the potential negatives. A robust, defence-in-depth Information Assurance strategy is still needed to form the basis of any defence strategy to keep data safe.



Paul German, CEO, Certes Networks

Wednesday, 16 January 2019

The Biggest Data Breaches of 2018

Online security label manufacturer Seareach.plc.uk who specialise in asset labels and asset tracking, has collated some of the biggest data breaches of 2018.



February

  • 150 million MyFitnessPal app users had their details leaked in a data breach including usernames, email addresses and passwords.
March
  • Orbitz had 880,000 customers payment card details, stolen by a hacker, thanks to a security vulnerability in the travel site's legacy booking system.
  • Fifa More than 3.4 terabytes of data and 70 million documents from FIFA, containing numerous allegations of corruption, was leaked to German magazine Der Spiegel by the Football Leaks organisation.
  • Cambridge Analytica harvested data (without user permission) from Facebook, more than 80 million people were affected by the data exposure.
April
  • Macy’s and Bloomingdale's online customers may have had their personal information and credit card details exposed to a third party between April 26 and June 12.
May
  • Rail Europe, breach saw customer details including credit card numbers, expiration dates, and card verification codes, stolen over three months.
June
  • Over a million Adidas customers were affected by their data breach. The website was hacked with contact information, usernames, and hashed passwords stolen.
July
  • Timehop suffered a significant data breach on 7 July 2018 names, email addresses and phone numbers of 21 million users were accessed.
  • Ticketmaster suffered data breach which saw hackers operating a massive credit card skimming operation, via third-party code installed on e-commerce websites.
  • 23,000 Fortnum and Mason customers details were accessed in a data breach, including addresses and contact phone numbers.
August
  • British Airways data breach hit 380,000 transactions through their website and mobile app. Personal and financial information was stolen.
September
  • 90 million Facebook user accounts were exposed when hackers stole access tokens that they could then use to take over almost 50 million profiles.
November
  • Cathay Pacific admitted this month that they had suffered a significant data breach affecting up to 9.4 million passengers, in March.
  • Over 100 million Quora users had their emails, passwords and names taken. The breach occurred after unauthorised access by a malicious third party.
  • Details from over 500 million guest reservations, were stolen from Marriot's Starwood database. Customers were notified in November but authorised accessed could date back to 2014.
December

  • Twitter was hit by a data breach on its platforms support form. It exposed user data to IP addresses from Saudi Arabia and China.

Monday, 14 January 2019

Microsoft Windows 7 & Windows 2008 End of Life

Microsoft Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 End of Life is fast approaching. 'End of Life' is the point where the operating system will be no longer supported with security patches, unless you (as a business) take out a rather expensive extended warranty agreement with Microsoft.



As a home user, you should upgrade from Windows 7 without delay, as there are significant performance improvements to be gained with Windows 10. I always recommend installing Windows 10 from scratch onto a blank hard disk drive, rather than using the upgrade option. Ideally install onto a new Solid State Drive (SSD), which improves an operating system's performance massively. SSDs have come down in price in recent months, making a decent memory size SSD an affordable option. Always ensure all your important documents and data are backed up at all times, double check before attempting an operating system installation or upgrade.

Where as a businesses you have Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 present, it is imperative not to leave your upgrade plan until the last minute, as mass operating systems upgrades within business can be fraught with delays due to technical issues to overcome, and unforeseen business circumstances. Also, Microsoft Windows Server 2016 has a significant virtualisation perform kick over 2008 & 2012 versions. And given the high security risk or cost in purchasing a Microsoft Extended Warranty, there really can be no solid business reason for delaying an upgrade project.

Microsoft Product     End of Life Date
Windows 7                      14/01/2020
Windows Server 2008    14/01/2020
Office 2010                     13/10/2020
Windows Server 2012    10/01/2023
Windows 8/8.1                10/01/2023
Office 2013                     11/04/2023
Windows 10                    14/10/2025
Office 2016                     14/10/2025

For further Microsoft EOF details see https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/13853/windows-lifecycle-fact-sheet

Sunday, 6 January 2019

Cyber Security Conferences to Attend in 2019

A list of Cyber and Information Security conferences to consider attending in 2019. Conference are not only great places to learn about the evolving cyber threat landscape and proven security good practices, but to network with industry leading security professionals and likeminded enthusiasts, to share ideas, expand your own knowledge, and even to make good friends.

JANUARY 2019

SANS Cyber Threat Intelligence Summit
Monday 21st & Tuesday 22nd January 2019
Renaissance Arlington Capital View Hotel, VA, USA
https://www.sans.org/event/cyber-threat-intelligence-summit-2018


AppSec California 2019 (OWASP)
Tuesday 22nd & Wednesday 23rd January 2019
Annenberg Community Beach House, Santa Monica, USA
https://2019.appseccalifornia.org/


PCI London
Thursday 24th January 2019
Park Plaza Victoria Hotel, London, UK
https://akjassociates.com/event/pcilondon

The Future of Cyber Security Manchester
Thursday 24th January 2019
Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, UK
https://cybermanchester.events/

BSides Leeds
Friday 25th January 2019
Cloth Hall Court, Leeds, UK
FEBRUARY 2019
Cyber Security for Industrial Control Systems

Thursday 7th & Friday 8th February 2019
Savoy Place, London, UK
https://events.theiet.org/cyber-ics/index.cfm

NOORD InfoSec Dialogue UK
Tuesday 26th & Wednesday 27th February 2019
The Bull-Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, UK

MARCH 2019
RSA Conference
Monday 4th to Friday 8th March 2019
At Moscone Center, San Francisco, USA
https://www.rsaconference.com/events/us19

17th Annual e-Crime & Cybersecurity Congress
Tuesday 5th & Wednesday 6th March 2019
Park Plaza Victoria

Security & Counter Terror Expo
Tuesday 5th & Wednesday 6th March 2019
Olympia, London, UK
https://www.counterterrorexpo.com/


ISF UK Spring Conference
Wednesday 6th & Thursday 7th March 2019
Regent Park, London, UK
https://www.securityforum.org/events/chapter-meetings/uk-spring-conference-london/


BSidesSF
Sunday 3rd and Monday 4th March 2019
City View at Metreon, San Francisco, USA
https://bsidessf.org/

Cloud and Cyber Security Expo
Tuesday 12th to Wednesday 13 March 2019
At ExCel, London, UK
https://www.cloudsecurityexpo.com/

APRIL 2019

(ISC)2 Secure Summit EMEA
Monday 15th & Tuesday 16th April 2019
World Forum, The Hague, Netherlands
https://web.cvent.com/event/df893e22-97be-4b33-8d9e-63dadf28e58c/summary

Cyber Security Manchester
Wednesday 3rd & Thursday 4th April 2019
Manchester Central, Manchester, UK
https://cybermanchester.events/

BSides Scotland 2019
Tuesday 23rd April 2019
Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh, UK
https://www.contextis.com/en/events/bsides-scotland-2019


CyberUK 2019
Wednesday 24th & Thursday 25th April 2019
Scottish Event Campus, Glasgow, UK
https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/information/cyberuk-2019

Cyber Security & Cloud Expo Global 2019
Thursday 25th and Friday 29th April 2019
Olympia, London, UK
https://www.cybersecuritycloudexpo.com/global/


JUNE 2019
Infosecurity Europe 2019
Tuesday 4th to Thursday 6th June 2019
Where Olympia, London, UK
https://www.infosecurityeurope.com/

BSides London

Thursday 6th June 2019
ILEC Conference Centre, London, UK
https://www.securitybsides.org.uk/

Blockchain International Show
Thursday 6th and Friday 7th June 2019
ExCel Exhibition & Conference Centre, London, UK
https://bisshow.com/

Hack in Paris 2019
Sunday 16th to Friday 20th June 2019
Maison de la Chimie, Paris, France
https://hackinparis.com/

UK CISO Executive Summit
Wednesday 19th June 2019
Hilton Park Lane, London, UK
https://www.evanta.com/ciso/summits/uk#overview

Cyber Security & Cloud Expo Europe 2019
Thursday 19th and Friday 20th June 2019
RIA, Amsterdam, Netherlands
https://cybersecuritycloudexpo.com/europe/

Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit
Monday 17th to Thursday 20th June 2019
National Harbor, MD, USA
https://www.gartner.com/en/conferences/na/security-risk-management-us

European Maritime Cyber Risk Management Summit
Tuesday 25th June 2019
Norton Rose Fulbright, London, UK


AUGUST 2019
Black Hat USA
Saturday 3rd to Thursday 8th August 2019
Mandalay Bay, Las Vegas, NV, USA
https://www.blackhat.com/upcoming.html

DEF CON 27

Thursday 8th to Sunday 11th August 2019
Paris, Ballys & Planet Hollywood, Las Vegas, NV, USA
https://www.defcon.org/


SEPTEMBER 2019
44Con
Wednesday 11th to Friday 13th September 2019
ILEC Conference Centre, London, UK
https://44con.com/

2019 PCI SSC North America Community Meeting
Tuesday 17th to Thursday 19th September 2019
Vancouver, BC, Canada
https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/about_us/events

OCTOBER 2019

Hacker Halted
Thursday 10th & Friday 11th October 2019
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
https://www.hackerhalted.com/

BruCON
Thursday 10th & Friday 11th October 2019
Aula, Gent, Belgium
https://www.brucon.org/2019/

EuroCACS/CSX (ISACA) 2019

Wednesday 16th to Friday 19th October 2019
Palexpo Convention Centre, Geneva, Switzerland
https://conferences.isaca.org/euro-cacs-csx-2019

6th Annual Industrial Control Cyber Security Europe Conference
Tuesday 29th and Wednesday 30th October 2019
Copthorne Tara, Kensington, London, UK
https://www.cybersenate.com/new-events/2018/11/13/6th-annual-industrial-control-cyber-security-europe-conference

2019 PCI SSC Europe Community Meeting

Tuesday 22nd to Thursday 24th October 2019
Dublin, Ireland
https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/about_us/events

ISF 30th Annual World Congress
Saturday 26th to Tuesday 29th October 2019
Convention Centre Dublin, Dublin, Ireland



NOVEMBER 2019
Cyber Security & Could Expo North America 2019
Wednesday 13th and Thursday 14th November 2019
Santa Clara Convention Centre, Silicon Valley, USA
https://www.cybersecuritycloudexpo.com/northamerica/

DevSecCon London 
Thursday 14th & Friday 15th November 2019
CodeNode, London, UK


Cyber Security Summit 2019
Wednesday 20th November 2019
QEII Centre, London, UK
https://cybersecuritysummit.co.uk/

2019 PCI SSC Asia-Pacific Community Meeting 

Wednesday 20th and Thursday 21st November 2019
Melbourne, Australia
https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/about_us/events

DeepSec
Thursday 20th to Saturday 30th November 2019
The Imperial Riding School Vienna, Austria
https://deepsec.net/

Post in the comments about any cyber & information security themed conferences or events you recommend.

Friday, 4 January 2019

What does Cybersecurity have in store for 2019?

A guest article authored by Tom Kellermann, Chief Cybersecurity Officer, Carbon Black

In every intelligence industry there’s often a central aim: predicting the future. We collect and analyse, dissect and interpret, looking for that essential nugget that will give us the edge over our adversaries by indicating what they’ll do next. While this activity goes on 24/7/365, the end of the year encourages us to go public with forecasts to help navigate the choppy waters on the horizon. This year, because all good intelligence involves collaboration, I’ve combined my thoughts with those of our threat analysts and security strategists to give some insight into the TTPs and sectors likely to be top of the list for cyberattackers in 2019.

1. Destructive attacks and nation-state activity continue to ramp up
Geo-political tension remained high throughout 2018, bringing with it an associated uplift in cyber insurgency. The US trade war with China is undoubtedly a factor behind the recent resurgence in Chinese cyber espionage and this is set to continue. As well as espionage targeted at infiltration and data theft, our intelligence detected an escalation of attacks where the primary objective was destruction. Our most recent Quarterly Incident Response Threat Report (QIRTR) depicted a wide-spread adoption of C2 on sleep cycles and a high prevalence of attack victims experiencing island hopping and counter incident response.

In 2019, I’m predicting we’ll see more instances of island hopping, particularly via public cloud infrastructure. We’ll also continue to see a wave of destructive attacks as geopolitical tension continues to manifest itself in cyberspace.

2. Counter-detection gets more sophisticated
In 2019, we’ll continue to see attackers attempt to counter detection in the form of Vapor worms – fileless attacks that display worm characteristics and propagate through networks - and IoT worms. As attackers become more sophisticated in their methods, defenders will need to get more adept at spotting evidence of incursions through proactive threat hunting and analysis.

3. Breach to extortion will become common
Paul Drapeau, Enterprise Architect in our Threat Analysis Unit, believes our habit of putting our private lives online in the hands of third parties will come back to haunt us in 2019. He told me:

“Attackers have been actively using ransomware to make a quick buck by locking systems and encrypting files, but this activity could move from compromise of systems to compromise of personal lives. Breaches of social media platforms present a wealth of data to be mined by bad actors. This data could be used to correlate activities between people to find illegal, scandalous or compromising behaviour and then leveraged for traditional blackmail at scale. “Pay up or your spouse/employer gets copies of these direct messages,” an example note might read. We can fight ransomware on our own networks with anti-malware tools or backups, but we depend on giant companies to protect our more personal details.”

The breach doesn’t even have to be real to result in extortion attempts, as was seen in 2018 with the mass email scam purporting to have compromising video and passwords of the victims. Imagine an attacker building on data from a breach and fabricating message contents and then demanding “ransom” be paid. This type of attack definitely takes more work to pull off, it’s more targeted and difficult, but the payoff could be there. Victims may be willing to pay more money and pay up more readily when it is their real lives and reputations at stake vs. their digital files.

4. Supply-chain attacks in healthcare
When it comes to the sectors facing the highest risk, our Security Strategist Stacia Tympanick expects to see a lot more supply chain attacks occur within the Healthcare industry. Healthcare is a tough attack surface to protect and could be a tempting target for nation-state actors bent on disrupting critical national infrastructure (CNI).

There is so much focus on just making sure that devices are discovered and protected on networks, that managing medical devices on top of this opens up a large attack surface. The trend toward remotely managing patient conditions via IoT devices increases that surface still further – this vector could be weaponised by bad actors.

Healthcare is also starting to move to the cloud as part of UK government’s ‘Cloud-first’ policy, so cloud providers should be evaluated under a stern eye to ensure that proper and secure procedures/processes are in place to protect patient data.

5. Steganography makes a comeback
I always like to make at least one semi-bold prediction each year, and this year I’m saying that steganography makes a comeback. Steganography is the technique of hiding secret information within innocuous images or documents and it’s an ancient practice – think Da Vinci hiding codes in the Mona Lisa. Examples of steganography are just as hard to detect in the cyber world, with code being masked in legitimate files designed to make it past scanners and firewalls. We could see steganography being used in combination with other attack vectors to create persistence and control mechanisms for malware that’s already running on a compromised network.

Whatever 2019 holds, here at Carbon Black we’ll be working 24/7 to collect, analyse and interpret the intel that will keep us a step ahead of our adversaries. Wishing you all a happy and cybersafe New Year!

Tom Kellermann, Chief Cybersecurity Officer, Carbon Black

Thursday, 3 January 2019

Cyber Security Roundup for December 2018

The final Cyber Security Roundup of 2018 concludes reports of major data breaches, serious software vulnerabilities and evolving cyber threats, so pretty much like the previous 11 months of the year.

5.3 millions users of "make your own avatar" app Boomoji had their accounts compromised, after the company reportedly didn't secure their internet connected databases properly. "Question and Answer" website Quora also announced the compromise of 100 million of its user accounts following a hack.


A large data breach reported in Brazil is of interest, a massive 120 million Brazilian citizens personal records were compromised due to a poorly secured Amazon S3 bucket. This is not the first mass data breach caused by an insecure S3 bucket we've seen in 2018, the lesson to be learnt in the UK, is to never assume or take cloud security for granted, its essential practice to test and audit cloud services regularly.

Amongst the amazing and intriguing space exploration successes reported by NASA in December, the space agency announced its employee's personal data may had been compromised. Lets hope poor security doesn't jeopardise the great and highly expensive work NASA are undertaking.  
NASA InSight Lander arrives on Mars 

It wouldn't be normal for Facebook not to be in the headlines for poor privacy, this time Facebook announced a Photo API bug which exposed 6.8 million user images

Away from the political circus that is Brexit, the European Parliament put into a law a new Cybersecurity Act. Because of the Brexit making all the headlines, this new law may have gone under the radar, but it certainly worth keeping an eye on, even after UK leaves the EU. The EU Parliament has agreed to increase the budget for the ENISA (Network & InfoSec) agency, which will be rebranded as the "EU Agency for Cybersecurity". The Cybersecurity Act will establish an EU wide framework for cyber-security certifications for online services and customer devices to be used within the European Economic Area, and will include IoT devices and critical infrastructure technology. Knowing the EU's love of regulations, I suspect these new best practice framework and associated accreditations to be turned into regulations further down the line, which would impact any tech business operating in European Union.

The UK Parliament enacted the "The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Act", which also went under the radar due to all the Brexit political noise. The act requires the appointment of a data guardian within England and Wales. The data guardian will publish guidance on the processing of health and adult social care data for use by public bodies providing health or social care services, and produce an annual report.

Chinese telecoms giant Huawei had plenty of negative media coverage throughout December, with UK government pressuring BT into not using Huawei kit within BT's new 5G network, due to a perceived threat to UK's future critical national infrastructure posed by the Chinese stated-backed tech giant.  The UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said he had "very deep concerns" about Huawei being involved in new UK mobile network.
Security company Insinia cause controversy after it took over the Twitter accounts by Eamon Holmes, Louis Theroux and several others celebs. Insinia said it had managed the account takeover by analysing the way Twitter handles messages posted by phone, to inject messages onto the targeted accounts by analysing the way the social network interacted with smartphones when messages are sent. However, Insinia were accused of being unethical and breaking the UK Computer Misuse Act in some quarters.

Unsecured internet connected printers are being hacked again, this time they were used to sent print out messages of support for Swedish YouTube star PewDiePie. A hacker named TheHackerGiraffe was said to have targeted up 50,000 printers after using Shodan to search for open printer ports online, the scan was said to have found 800,000 vulnerable printers.

An Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) report warned UK banks about their over-reliance on third-party security providers. The FCA said companies "generally lacked board members with strong familiarity or specific technical cyber-expertise. External expertise may be helpful but may also, if overly relied on, undermine the effectiveness of the ‘three lines of defence’ model in identifying and managing cyber-risks in a timely way. The report also warned about supply-chain security, especially the role that firms play in other organisations’ supply chains.

NEWS

AWARENESS, EDUCATION AND THREAT INTELLIGENCE
REPORTS

Wednesday, 2 January 2019

Cyber Security Predictions for 2019

A guest article authored by Jim Ducharme, Vice President of Engineering and Product Management at RSA

1. Prepare for IOT, the “Identity of Things”
From personal assistants, to wearables, smartphones, tablets and more, there is no shortage of connected devices. The explosion of IOT has finally reached a tipping point where the conversation of identity will start to take on a whole new meaning. The billions of new digital identities being created don’t come without risk – including new privacy and cybersecurity vulnerabilities. With businesses and consumers all in on IOT, how do we protect and securely manage the “identity” of the things? 

2. Biometrics vs. the Four-Digit Pin
Biometrics are under a lot of pressure these days to be the silver bullet of authentication. So how could a simple 4-digit pin, which has at most 10,000 possible combinations, give biometrics like FaceID with a 1 in 50 million entropy a run for its money? The industry will come to realize when 4-digit pins are combined with AI and machine learning, the four-digit pin, similar to what has been used for decades to protect access to our bank accounts, can provide a very high level of security. The ultimate goal for identity and access management is not to find the unbreakable or “unhackable” code for authentication, but rather, to layer security to create a much stronger identity assurance posture. AI and machine learning will be a game changer, allowing for intelligence-driven authentication that will open up additional options of security layers for organizations.  

3. Death of the Password?
We have long seen predictions that passwords are in their final days. But it’s time to come to grips that passwords will be here for a long time. But perhaps there is still hope that while we may be living with passwords for generations to come, they may be a lot less scary than the monster we have created. It’s time to reverse the trend of how complex passwords have become (MyKitsH8Me!) and how hard they are to manage (having to change them every 60 days) in an attempt to improve password strength. We can uncomplicate the password and unburden it from having the ultimate responsibility of security. A much more simple password coupled with additional layers of risk-based authentication, especially those factors invisible to the user like behavioral, location and device context, and even transparent biometrics can help businesses better secure access to critical resources.

4. A New Generation of Risk-based Authentication
With a seemingly endless stream of high-profile data breaches and malicious cyberattacks, the need to ramp up security and manage identities is evident. 2019 will see the beginning of a new generation of risk-based authentication, powered by machine learning and user behavior analytics. Organizations will start to uncover their own unique context and identity insights to gain a more comprehensive view of user identities including locations, behavior patterns, frequency of use and more. This new generation of risk-based authentication will allow organizations to reduce the friction on end users when accessing applications and information while strengthening the assurance that the user is who they claim to be.

Jim Ducharme, Vice President of Engineering and Product Management at RSA