Thursday, 26 March 2020

Working from Home Cybersecurity Guidance


Working from home comes with a range of security risks, but employees need to be educated too – human behaviour is invariably the weakest link in a company’s cybersecurity posture. In the current environment, with many more employees working at home, cybercriminals are actively looking for opportunities to launch phishing attacks and compromise the IT infrastructure of businesses, large and small. 

Guidance on Working from Home All companies should start by reviewing the home working guidance available at the UK Government’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC). This resource helps companies prepare their employees and think about the best way to protect their systems. Crossword has been advising a number of its FTSE clients in a range of sectors, and below is a summary of the guidance given, in addition to that from the NCSC.

Run Audio and Video calls Securely

What is visible in the background of your screen during video calls and is someone monitoring who is on the call? The same is true for audio only calls. A team member should be responsible for ensuring only invited guests are present, and calls should be locked once started, so other participants cannot join.

Educate Employees on Phishing attacks
The NCSC mentions COVID-19 related Phishing attacks which use the current crisis to trick employees into clicking on fake links, downloading malware, and revealing passwords – so educate them. These could be fake HR notifications or corporate communications; fake tax credits; fake emails from mortgage providers; free meals and mechanisms for registering for them. The list is endless and cyber criminals are very news savvy and quick to adapt. Employees are likely to be more vulnerable to phishing attacks due to people rushing, fear, panic, and urgency; all the behavioural traits that result in successful phishing attacks.

Automate Virtual Personal Network configurations (VPNs) 
IT and Security teams may have a backlog of users to set up on VPNs, to provide secure connections to corporate networks. Do not allow employees to send data insecurely, use automation to make accelerated deployments and guarantee correct configuration. Even IT staff are fallible, and the combination of pressure of work volume and working fast, may leave a gaping hole in your infrastructure.

Control the use of Personal Devices for Corporate Work
Due to the rapid increase in home workers, many employees may be using their own devices to access emails and data, which may not be covered by Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies. What this means in practicality, is that employee’s personal devices may not be securely configured, nor managed properly and be more vulnerable. IT and Security teams again, may need to retrospectively ensure that employees are complying with BYOD policies, have appropriate endpoint security software installed etc.

Stop Personal Email and Unauthorised Cloud Storage Use
When companies are experiencing IT difficulties in setting up employees working from home, people may be tempted to use personal emails or their personal cloud to send and store data, as a work around. These are a risk and can be easy for cyber criminals to target to gain company information or distribute malware, as they are not protected by the corporate security infrastructure.

Keep Collaboration Tools Up-to-date
Tools such as Microsoft Teams, Zoom and Google Hangouts are great, but it is important to ensure all call participants are using the latest versions of the software, and that includes partners and customers that may be on calls. Employees should also only use the corporate approved tools and versions as they will have been tested by security teams for vulnerabilities, that could be exploited by cybercriminals. 

Stuart Jubb, Consulting Director at Crossword commented: “Throughout the UK, companies are doing everything they can to ensure business continues as normally as possible as the COVID-19 situation develops. The guidance we are issuing today is a summary of the key points we have been discussing with our clients across a wide range of vertical markets. Good IT security measures are arguably more important than ever as companies become a largely distributed workforce, almost overnight. As ever though, it is not just about the technology, but good behaviour and education amongst employees as cybercriminals work to exploit any vulnerability they can find, whether that be a person, mis-configured tech, or unpatched software.”

Tuesday, 24 March 2020

Coronavirus Cybersecurity: Scams To Watch Out For

The Coronavirus pandemic has shocked the world in recent months, with many countries being forced to go into lockdown or encourage its nationals to self-isolate as much as possible. Many are trying to work out how to juggle working from home, caring for their children, managing their finances and looking after their health! But sadly, there’s one more thing you need to add to that list - staying safe online and watching out for scammers. 

That’s because cybercriminals have decided to take advantage of the global fear, confusion and uncertainty around the world. Plus, vast numbers of people are now working from home and this usually means they are doing so with less cybersecurity measures in place than they would have in their office. 

Malicious messages examples seen
  • email and social media messages impersonating medical expert bodies including the NHS, World Health Organization (WHO), and Centre for Disease and Control (CDC), requesting a donation to research a vaccine.
  • GOV.UK themed text messages titled 'You are eligible to get a tax refund (rebate) of 128.34 GBP
  • messages advertising protective masks and hand sanitisers from bogus websites
So, despite this being a time when we all need to pull together and help one another out, there are still scammers out there looking to cause trouble. To help keep you safe online, Evalian has compiled a list of four of the most common Coronavirus scams happening right now, so you know what to look out for. 

1. Phishing Scams 
This is perhaps the biggest scam out there right now because phishing emails can come in many different forms. Most commonly, hackers are pretending to be health officials or national authorities offering advice about staying safe during the Corona outbreak. The reality is that they are trying to trick unsuspecting individuals into downloading harmful malware or providing sensitive, personal information. 

Some of these phishing emails look really sophisticated, with one in particular being a fake email sent from the World Health Organisation (WHO), offering tips on how to avoid falling ill with the virus. Once the email user clicks on the link provided, they are redirected to a site that steals their personal information. The problem is, with so many people being genuinely worried about their health and hoping to stop the spread, many don’t suspect that these types of emails could be a scam. 

The best way to avoid falling victim to these types of phishing emails is to look for suspicious email addresses or lots of spelling mistakes. And even if the email looks pretty legitimate, it might still be worth going direct to the sender’s website instead. For example, going direct to the World Health Organisation website for advice means you can avoid clicking any links from the email. That way you can find the information you need and reduce the risk of falling victim to a cybercrime. 

Secondly, if an email asks for money or bitcoin donations to help tackle Coronavirus, don’t make any transfers. Again, if you wish to help by donating money or services, go directly to the websites of charities or health organisations to see how you can help.

It’s also worth noting, that these phishing scams can also be received as a text message or phone call. If you receive strange texts or voicemails asking for donations, giving offers on vaccines or warning you about cases in your local area, approach with caution and certainly don’t give away any of your personal details. 

2. Fake Websites
Another common scam designed to play on fear and uncertainty is the setting up of fake websites. Cybercriminals are creating Coronavirus-related websites which claim to offer pharmaceuticals or remedies for the virus such as testing kits, vaccines, and other fake health solutions. The idea is to get anxious victims to part with their bank details or to hack their computer and install malware on their systems. 

In these situations, there are some things you can do. Firstly, check if the website has a secure connection. You’ll know whether it does or doesn't by the padlock in the search bar. If there is a padlock in the search bar this means the site is secure, if there isn't, then it’s a good idea to avoid this site. Not only this but if the website is poorly designed and the text has a lot of spelling and grammatical errors, this could also be a big red flag. 

Finally, it’s also important to be aware that not many sites are genuinely going to be offering these health solutions and if they appear to be selling in-demand products at an extremely low price, then it’s most likely a scam. Remember, if it seems to good to be true then it probably is. 

3. App Scams 
Cybercriminals are also targeting smartphones and mobile devices with dedicated Coronavirus apps. These apps claim to track the spread of the virus in your local area and with many people concerned about the proximity of the virus to their home, it’s not surprising that people are willing to download such an app. 

The reality, however, is that the app then installs malware into your device and not only comprises your tech, but also all the personal information stored within it. In some cases, the app can lock victims out of their phone or tablet demanding a ransom to get back in, threatening to delete all the information, contact details and photos stored inside.

4. Fake Coronavirus Maps
Last but not least, the fake Coronavirus map scam. Similar to that of the tracking app, cybercriminals have begun circulating graphics of fake maps on which they claim to highlight where all the Coronavirus cases are in your country. These are usually sent round on social media and through email. 

Of course, these images are not meant to educate or help you in any way. In fact, the scammers include malware in the links so that once you’ve clicked to open the image this immediately infects your device. In most cases, this has been reported to be the kind of bug that can steal data such as bank details, passwords, login information and other sensitive data stored on your device. 

Look for the Red Flags 
  • Never open attachments or click on links within suspicious or unexpected emails, text and social media messages
  • Look for the suspicious signs; does the message convey a sense of urgency to perform an action?
  • Always remember legitimate organisations never ask for passwords, payment card details and sensitive data to be sent by email
In these troubling and uncertain times, you’d be forgiven for falling for a scam if you thought for one second it could help to keep you and your family safe from this virus. But sadly, there are criminals out there taking advantage of people’s anxiety. So just be aware that these scams are happening and look out for the red flags we’ve mentioned above to help you stay safe online. 

Monday, 23 March 2020

Payment Card Transactions in the UK will be increased from £30 to £45 due to Coronavirus

The contactless limit for in-store card transactions in the UK will be increased from £30 to £45 from 1st April. A good move for preventing COVID-19 spread at supermarkets and petrol stations via payment pinpads, which are impossible to keep sanitised.

Better still, everyone right now can benefit from secure MFA contactless payments with higher limits by setting up Apple Pay, Google Pay or, Samsung Pay on your smartphone.

BRC Head of Payments Policy, Andrew Cregan, said: “The last contactless limit increase to £30 took two years to implement but, given the extraordinary circumstances we face today, this new £45 limit will be rolled-out from next week. Some shops will take longer to make the necessary changes, given the strain they’re under. In the meantime, most customers can continue to make contactless payments for higher amounts using their smart phone.”

Monday, 2 March 2020

Cyber Security Roundup for March 2020

A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, February 2020.

Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council became the latest UK organisation to become the victim of a mass ransomware attack which started on 8th February.  The north-east Council's servers, PCs, mobile devices, websites and even phone lines have been down for three weeks at the time of writing. A Redcar and Cleveland councillor told the Guardian it would take several months to recover and the cost is expected to between £11m and £18m to repair the damage done. A significant sum for the cash-strapped council, which confirmed their outage as ransomware caused 19 days after the attack. The strain of ransomware involved and the method initial infiltration into the council's IT systems has yet to be confirmed.


The English FA shut down its investigation into allegations Liverpool employees hacked into Manchester City's scouting system. The Manchester club also made news headlines after UEFA banned it from European competition for two years, a ban based on alleged stolen internal email evidence obtained by a hacker.  Read The Billion Pound Manchester City Hack for further details.

The UK government said GRU (Russian military intelligence) was behind a massive cyber-attack which knocked out more than 2,000 websites in the country of Georgia last year, in "attempt to undermine Georgia's sovereignty". Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab described it as "totally unacceptable".

The United States deputy assistant secretary for cyber and communications, Robert Strayer, said he did not believe the UK government's January 2020 decision to allow Huawei limited access to UK's 5G infrastructure was final. 'Our understanding is that there might have been some initial decisions made but conversations are continuing," he told the BBC. Read The UK Government Huawei Dilemma and the Brexit Factor for more on UK government's Huawei political, economic and security debate.

Following Freedom of Information requests made by Viasat, it reported UK government employees had either lost or stolen 2,004 mobiles and laptops between June 2018 and June 2019.

According to figures by the FBI, cybercriminals netted £2.7bn ($3.5bn) from cyber-crimes report 2019, with phishing and extortion remaining the most common method of scamming people. These FBI reported cybercrime losses have tripled over the past 5 years. The FBI concluded that cyber scam techniques are becoming more sophisticated, making it harder for original people to tell "real from fake".  A new Kaspersky report backs up the FBI, finding a 9.5% growth in financial phishing during the final quarter of 2019.

The Labour party is facing data protection fines of up £15m for failing to protect their members' personal data. The Information Commissioner's Office confirmed the Labour Party would be the focus of their investigation since it is legally responsible for securing members' information as the "data controller".

This month's cloud misconfiguration breach award goes to french sports retail giant Decathlon, after 123 million customer records were found to be exposed by researchers at vpnMentor .  Leaked data included employee usernames, unencrypted passwords and personally identifiable information (PII) including social security numbers, full names, addresses, mobile phone numbers, addresses and birth dates. “The leaked Decathlon Spain database contains a veritable treasure trove of employee data and more. It has everything that a malicious hacker would, in theory, need to use to take over accounts and gain access to private and even proprietary information,” said vpnMentor.

If you have a 'Ring' smart camera doorbell (IoT) device then may have noticed Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) was mandated in February.  Ring's stance of enforcing a strengthening of security may be related to several recent high-profile home camera hack reports.
Ring: An IoT device's security improved by mandated 2FA

The facial recognition company Clearview AI advised a hacker stole its client list database. The firm works with law enforcement agencies and gained notoriety after admitting it had scrapped billions of individuals photos off the internet.

BLOG
NEWS
VULNERABILITIES AND SECURITY UPDATES AWARENESS, EDUCATION AND THREAT INTELLIGENCE